Dinner Meeting: Full Stack Development with Java and NoSQL

This is a joint meeting with the Connecticut Java User Group.

Please register for this meeting (link).

Date: Tuesday May 3rd @ 6:30 PM

Directions on the registration link.

Abstract

In this session will talk about what is different about this generation of web applications and how a solid development approach must consider the latency, throughput and interactivity demand by users across both mobile devices, web browsers, and IoT.  We will demonstrate how to include Couchbase in such applications to support a flexible data model and easy scalability required for modern development.

We will demonstrate how to create a full stack application focusing on Java, Couchbase, and AngularJS.

Speaker

Nic is a Developer Advocate for Couchbase in the San Francisco Bay Area. He has released several native and hybrid mobile applications to iTunes and Google Play and writes about his development experiences related to
making web and mobile app development easier to understand.  He has experience in Unity3D, Apache Cordova, Java, NoSQL, SQL, PHP, and Node.js.

Before joining Couchbase, Nic worked within the higher education system building and managing applications that scale for the growth of the student population.

 

Meeting: Security and Privacy Enhancement in Biometrics

Greater Hartford ACM Chapter will be hosting its fall meeting on November 2nd at CCSU. Distinguished ACM speaker Dr. Ratha will be giving a talk on “Security and Privacy Enhancement in Biometrics”.

Note: Meeting is free and open to non-ACM members.

Date: November 2nd @ 6:30

002 Vance Hall

Central Connecticut State University

1615 Stanley Street, New Britain, CT 06050

A parking garage, a.k.a. “Vance Garage” is attached to Vance Hall. It is open to public in the evening (after 5 p.m.). The entrance to the parking garage is found on “Paul Manafort Drive.” You can see it on the interactive map at here.

After parking your car, enter the building, then go down one floor. The classroom is in the basement. The room number is “002”.

Abstract

Biometrics, as an authentication tool, provides several advantages over conventional what you know (e.g., password, PIN) and what you possess (e.g., keys, tokens) authentication methods. It is commonly believed that biometrics when introduced in an authentication system can improve the overall security of the system. Based on a pattern recognition model of biometrics-based authentication system, we argue that when properly designed a biometrics-based authentication system can be highly secure. We identify several attack points in a biometrics-based authentication system and propose counter measures to thwart the attacks. With the improved awareness of the possible attacks, systems incorporating biometrics can be built with higher security.

A biometrics is also an irrevocable password as we can’t change the biometrics easily. If it is compromised digitally, it is compromised for ever. Secondly, a biometrics can be easily matched against multiple databases to link identities. In order to alleviate privacy deficiencies of biometrics, IBM Research has pioneered a new technique for protecting biometrics templates that can allow for revocation and anonymous sharing. Instead of enrolling with the true biometrics, the original signal/template is intentionally and repeatably distorted using a class of non-invertible functions. The resulting “transformed” biometrics is enrolled. During verification, the same distortion transformation is applied to the biometrics signal/template to match against the enrolled template. The proposed method supports revocability and permits anonymous matching where biometrics data sharing is prohibited.

Biography

Dr. Nalini K. Ratha is a Research Staff Member at IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY where he is the team leader for the biometrics-based authentication research. He has over 20 years of experience in the industry working in the area of pattern recognition, computer vision and image processing. He received his B. Tech. in Elelectrical Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, M.Tech. degree in Computer Science and Engineering also from Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur and Ph. D. in Computer Science from Michigan State University. He has authored more than 80 research papers in the area of biometrics and has been co-chair of several leading biometrics conferences and served on the editorial boards of IEEE Trans. on PAMI, IEEE Trans. on SMC-B, IEEE Trans. on Image Processing and Pattern Recognition journal. He has co-authored a popular book on biometrics entitled “Guide to Biometrics” and also co-edited two books entitled “Automatic Fingerprint Recognition Systems” and “Advances in Biometrics: Sensors, Algorithms and Systems”. He has offered tutorials on biometrics technology at leading IEEE conferences and also teaches courses on biometrics and security. He is Fellow of IEEE, Fellow of IAPR and a senior member for ACM. His research interests include biometrics, pattern recognition and computer vision. He has been an adjunct professor at IIIT Delhi, Cooper Union and NYU-Poly. During 2011-2012 he was the president of the IEEE Biometrics Council. At IBM, he has received several awards including a Research Division Award, Outstanding Innovation Award and Outstanding Technical Accomplishment Award along with several patent achievement awards.

Apache Hadoop Workshop with Sang Shin

March 27, 2015 – 9am – 5pm

Central Connecticut State University – Copernicus Hall Room NC 22406

The Greater Hartford ACM Chapter is proud to announce a workshop on Friday, March 27th at 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Apache Hadoop by Sang Shin. You do not have to be an ACM member to attend.

Abstract

Big Data Analytics is becoming an important business tool for business organizations in pretty much every domain.  It helps these organizations make better business decisions by enabling data analysists to analyze huge volumes of unstructured data that may be left untapped by conventional business intelligence or database technologies.   Apache Hadoop is an open source project that enables the big data analytics through distributed processing of large data sets across clusters of commodity servers. It is designed to scale up from a single server to thousands of machines.  When Hadoop was first released in 2011, comprising mainly HDFS and MapReduce, it soon became clear that Hadoop was not simply another application or service, but a platform around which an entire ecosystem of capabilities could be built. Since then, dozens of self-standing software projects have sprung into being around Hadoop, each addressing a variety of problem spaces and meeting different needs.  This workshop will start with basic motivation and architecture of Hadoop and then cover these technologies – HDFS, MapReduce, PIG, Hive, HBase, Sqoop, Oozie, and Flume – to the extent time permits.  (It is highly likely we will be able to cover only a subset of these topics given the time constraint.)

Speaker

Sang Shin is the founder and chief instructor at JavaPassion.com, a popular learning site for Java developers. Before founding JavaPassion.com, he was the lead Java technology architect and evangelist at Sun Microsystems. He frequently gives talks on various Java technologies such as Java EE, Java SE, Web application frameworks, Web services and SOA technologies to worldwide developer audience. He also gives talks on “Ruby on Rails”, JavaFX, and MySQL. As an adjunct professor, he also teaches software engineering courses in Brandeis university whenever he finds time. He currently teaches “J2EE programming (with Passion!)”, “Ajax programming (with Passion!)”, “Web services and SOA programming”, “Ruby, JRuby, and Rails Development (with Passion!)”, and “JavaFX programming (with passion!)” online courses. These online courses can be taken throughhttp://www.javapassion.com. He is the co-author of the Advanced Computer that was published by University of Maryland in 2005.

Registering:

For more information or to register, please visit our Eventbrite page at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/apache-hadoop-workshop-with-sang-shin-tickets-16021763526

Drones and UAVs

The Greater Hartford ACM Chapter is proud to announce their September general meeting on Tuesday September 9th at 6:30 pm. You DO NOT have to be an ACM member to attend.

Registration

Date: Tuesday September 9, 2014
Time: 6:30 pm
Location: MakeHartford
30 Arbor St, Hartford, CT

Event Details

Over the last decade, the field of Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (SUAS) has matured from cutting-edge military technology to recreational toys and budget DIY projects. Open Source software/hardware and online vendors have made it possible for amateurs and engineers to access the same SUAS components as professionals. This talk will explore remote control aircraft concepts, SUAS components, current regulation (and lack thereof), safe operations, research applications, and discuss where the field is going next.

About the Speaker

Paul Quimby started working with SUAS while an undergraduate researcher and continued his investigations as master’s student at MIT in the Humans and Automation Lab. After designing and building quadrotors interfaces flown by minimally-trained human operators, and performing the first real-world studies indoors, his research was continued to advance the understanding of flying SUAS in outdoor conditions. In addition to research, he enjoys building fixed-wing model aircraft for fun. In the past year, he was a co-organizer of the Drones and Aerial Robotics Conference at NYU Law, chairing the Safety and Public Airspace track. Paul currently works at the United Technologies Research Center in East Hartford, in collaboration with Sikorsky, Pratt & Whitney, Otis, and Carrier.

About the Venue

This talk will be held at MakeHartford, 30 Arbor St, Hartford CT. Enter the building via the main door and take the elevator down 1 floor to the basement. U-turn off the elevator and take a left. We are in the first right door. If you get lost, follow the bright green signs or call 203-516-0077 and someone will assist you.

MongoDB and NoSQL

The Greater Hartford ACM Chapter is proud to announce their April general meeting on Wednesday April 30th at 6:30 pm. You DO NOT have to be an ACM member to attend.

Registration

Date: Wednesday April 30, 2013
Time: 6:30 pm
Location: MakeHartford
30 Arbor St, Hartford, CT

Event Details

MongoDB is a cross-platform document-oriented database system, and is called a “NoSQL” database system, because it does not use traditional Structured Query Language.
We will discuss the database features, its advantages/disadvantages, and its underlying technologies, mainly JSON and Javascript. MongoDB is free and open-source software, and has been adopted as backend software by a number of major websites and services, including Craigslist, eBay, Foursquare, SourceForge, and the New York Times, among others.

About the Speaker

This talk will be presented by Paul Randolph, Application Development Senior Specialist at Cigna. Paul has been working with databases and writing code in Java since 2000.

About the Venue

This talk will be held at MakeHartford, 30 Arbor St, Hartford CT. Enter the building via the main door and take the elevator down 1 floor to the basement. U-turn off the elevator and take a left. We are in the first right door. If you get lost, follow the bright green signs or call 203-516-0077 and someone will assist you.

Stock Market Prediction Using Machine Learning

The Greater Hartford ACM Chapter is proud to announce their February general meeting on Wednesday February 26th at 6:00 pm. You DO NOT have to be an ACM member to attend.

Registration

Date: Wednesday February 26, 2013
Time: 6:00 pm
Location: MakeHartford
30 Arbor St, Hartford, CT

Event Details

Can the choice of words and tone used by the authors of financial news articles correlate to measurable stock price movements? If so, can the magnitude of price movement be predicted using these same variables? We investigate these questions using the Arizona Financial Text (AZFinText) system, a financial news article prediction system, and pair it with a sentiment analysis tool. Through our analysis, we found that subjective news articles were easier to predict in price direction (59.0% versus 50.0% of chance alone) and using a simple trading engine, subjective articles garnered a 3.30% return. Looking further into the role of author tone in financial news articles, we found that articles with a negative sentiment were easiest to predict in price direction (50.9% versus 50.0% of chance alone) and a 3.04% trading return. Investigating negative sentiment further, we found that our system was able to predict price decreases in articles of a positive sentiment 53.5% of the time, and price increases in articles of a negative sentiment 52.4% of the time. We believe that perhaps this result can be attributable to market traders behaving in a contrarian manner, e.g., see good news, sell; see bad news, buy.

About the Speaker

Dr. Schumaker is an Associate Professor of Management Information Systems at Central Connecticut State University. He received his PhD in Management from the University of Arizona in 2007, an MBA degree in Management and International Business from the University of Akron in 2001, and a Bachelors of Science degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Cincinnati in 1997.

He is also the Managing Editor for the CIIMA journal, has authored a book on Sports Data Mining, several book chapters, multiple journal articles in DSS, ACM TOIS, CACM and JASIST as well as had his research featured in the Wall Street Journal and numerous other media outlets.

Dr. Schumaker’s overall research interests involve the uses of technology to acquire, deliver and make predictions in a variety of Business-related environments. These interests further branch into computer mediated communications, design science, human computer interfaces, machine learning algorithms, natural language processing, technology acceptance models and textual data mining. In particular, he focuses on the areas of Question/Answer systems, Textual/Financial prediction and Sports Data Mining.

About the Venue

This talk will be held at MakeHartford, 30 Arbor St, Hartford CT. Enter the building via the main door and take the elevator down 1 floor to the basement. U-turn off the elevator and take a left. We are in the first right door. If you get lost, follow the bright green signs or call 203-516-0077 and someone will assist you.

Automated Software Testing Strategies

The Greater Hartford ACM Chapter is proud to announce their December general meeting on Tuesday December 3rd at 6:00 pm. You DO NOT have to be an ACM member to attend.

Registration

Date: Tuesday December 3, 2013
Time: 6:00 pm
Location: Center for Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences (Room MNH105)
Quinnipiac University *North Haven Campus*, 370 Bassett Rd, North Haven, CT

Event Details

Testing is an integral part of software development. Manually testing software every time a change is made can be very tedious and the chance of missing a test case is high with a large change. The easiest way to reduce the risk of modifying code is to have automated test suites that exercise the code. This talk will cover different granularities of testing that can be done by developers and different testing techniques. The goal of the talk is to show you how to introduce a safety net to your code base so you can refactor code aggressively and with confidence. Unit testing, integration testing, and acceptance testing techniques and tools will all be covered with live code examples. The presentation and all code done during the presentation will be available online after the talk. The coding will be done in C# using nUnit, Moq, SpecFlow, and FitNesse.

About the Speaker

Karim HadjSalem is a senior software developer and solutions architect who is currently working as a consultant through Tek Systems. He has been working with computers for over 20 years and has been programming professionally for 8. His main focus is clean code, well-designed systems, and agile methodologies.

About the Venue

The talk will be held in Center for Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences Room MNH105 at Quinnipiac University’s North Haven campus (not the main campus!) at 370 Bassett Rd, North Haven, CT. There is plenty of parking around campus. Refreshments of pizza and soda will be provided.